Articles Tagged with dui arrest

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Do the cops have to read me my Miranda Rights in Maryland after a DUI stop?

This is a common question that we get at Bruce Robinson and Associates, Maryland’s DUI Law Firm. Lawyer T.V. shows tend to portray lawyers as having a glamorous job they misrepresent a few things about lawyers and the law. It works the same way with medical dramas. After a few episodes of E.R. I feel like I can diagnose any disease.

Often people have assumptions about the law because they saw something on T.V. Most people who haven’t been living under a rock believe that the police have a legal obligation to read you your rights during an arrest. This can be correct depending on the type of case but it is also misleading. The origination of these rights stems from a landmark criminal case known as Miranda v. Arizona which involved kidnapping and armed robbery, among other crimes perpetuated by a laborer that was in and out of trouble his whole life. It had to do with a coerced confession without counsel- of defendant Ernesto Miranda.

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Reasons why a multiple DUI offender should hire the best DUI attorney they can.

Hint: All DUI lawyers are not created equal.

Most multiple DUI offenders believe that the judge is going to throw the book at them no matter what they do in preparation for their DUI trial. That is to say, they know things do not look good and many presume nothing can be done to fix or mitigate the situation. This is not true and is fatalistic to your case. Yes, judges are not looking to give a defendant with multiple prior DUIs a break, but with aggressive and knowledgeable defense counsel, sometimes things can work out far better then expected.

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Will you be considered a first offender in Maryland if it has been 10 years since your prior DUI conviction or PBJ? Well, it is much like your virginity, once you lose it-you lost it!

What do I mean by that? Once you have received a DUI or DWI and received some form of probation or guilty verdict, that can never be undone and you will never be considered a “first offender” again; in point of fact, you are not a first offender, you will be a second offender, even 10+ years later.  Now, if you go to court on your first offense and you are found Not Guilty by the judge or jury, well then that is NOT a first offense because you were not found guilty and you did not receive a probation before judgment.  A not guilty means you were not guilty of the charge and is therefore not considered a first offense.  In this instance, a “second violation” irrespective of when it occurs (1 year or 5 years) is indeed a first offense (because you beat the earlier offense) and you are entitled to first offense status.  Ie. eligible for a PBJ.

Now, what is this business about 10 years? That time period is the new limit in which a “second offender” is not even legally eligible for a probationary disposition such as  a PBJ.  Therefore, if in your first DUI offense you received the benefit of probation before judgment and therefore were able to keep your record clean and void of any points, that would mean you are not even eligible for a PBJ within 10 years of receiving your first PBJ. You can however retain the best lawyer you can find and fight your case in court and try to obtain a not guilty in the second offense.

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No DUI or criminal case is a slam dunk for the prosecution. Trial work is always fluid and anything can happen when you tell the Judge “Ready for trial.”  Have you ever noticed how many people never say that and just plead cases away? At Bruce Robinson & Associates we are a trial firm, we try DUI cases and we don’t hesitate to say “Ready for Trial.”

A recent example of this happened today in a DUI case in Cecil County, Maryland.  This Defendant was a multiple DUI offender with 2 DUIs within the past 5 years.  Two DUIs inside of a ten year period of time is a bad thing because the defendant is unable to get a probation before judgment and therefore must flat out win his case or he will suffer the consequences of a DUI conviction. In addition to being a multiple offender, this client also had a very high breath result. The State’s Attorney was demanding jail in front of a tough District Court Judge who would have loved nothing more than to oblige the State in it’s demand.

The Prosecutor asked me if  she needed all of her officers for this case. I was thinking, what a strange request, of course you do; evidently sh was used to too many lawyers who just roll plead their clients out. I told the prosecutor that not only did she need all her officers,  but they needed to be in the court room (not just generally available).  After half of the docket went by I began to see a glimmer of hope in the case that the State may not be able to prove its case because the arresting officers may not be available for trial. Ironically, the prosecutor never even checked in with her officers the day before as she is supposed to in order to obtain their presence in court.